There’s a New Podcast in Town

I used to watch this?

A couple of months back, I was out with two of my old friends.  While tipping back a few beers and munching on the delicious bar food, we got into the topic of old TV shows.  You, know, old.  Like from the 70s and 80s.  One friend, who also happens to be named Mike, half-joking, mentioned on how the conversation we were having would be an interesting podcast.  As the conversation deepened and the beers flowed, we committed to making a podcast about these old shows just for fun.   My other friend, let’s call him “Scott”…   well, that actually is his name, had no idea what a podcast is and offered to do some dance moves in the background.  We played along.

Unlike most ideas, we didn’t let this one drop.  While it’s not a business venture and we’re not expecting to profit from it, it was a great reason to stay connected an get together more frequently.   We threw together a website, gave ourselves a crash course on podcasting, and recorded and released our first episode on iTunes today.  Making that first episode was a lot of fun and a great learning experience.  Looking forward to the rest of them.

While it’s not a domaining related podcast, I invite you to check it out “I Used to Watch This?” on iTunes or where ever you happen to get your podcasts.  Give us a rating if you like it and stay tuned for the next episode where we talk about one of my favorite childhood shows.  I’m not the youngest domainer on the block so some of these may be hidden treasures younger people should check out to see how good/bad TV used to be.

NamePros Videos Coming to SullysBlog.com

NamePros

You may not realize it, but NamePros has a nice library of domain related videos.  They have done a lot of hard work producing these and they contain great information and dialog from seasoned pros in the industry.  I’ll be working with NamePros going forward to transcribe any new videos and post them here on SullysBlog.com as they become available.

In addition, I’ll be working through the backlog of videos from the library and transcribing them as well, posting them directly to the video section.  I will publish some of the most recent from the past few months as new posts, so look for those start as soon as later today.

I’m looking forward to this new addition to the blog and I hope you are as well.  Would love to hear your thoughts and comments as you have an opportunity to review them.

The Domain Sales Email that Caught my Eye

domain sales email

My email inbox certainly could have gone without seeing this email come through and still lived a clean and happy life.  But life isn’t fair and sometimes we can’t protect the ones we love from the harsh reality of the world.  Alright, I’m getting carried away, I don’t love my inbox.  I mean, I like it a lot, but love is a strong word.

Yesterday, I received an email offering a domain for sale.  I’m not easily offended, but lets keep it clean here.  The TLD was dot io, which is popular among some startups.  In this case, the the domain name was #ocks.io and let’s say it rhymes with socks.  Roosters are often referred to by this name… among other things.

The point of this post is not the domain name itself, but the email that represented it.  The email wasn’t particularly well written.  In fact, the salutation stated “Dear Paul King.”  Clearly all recipients were referred to as Paul King (sorry Paul).  What caught my eye was what I consider to be the most important aspect of a sales email.  The title.

I opened my inbox to find about 20 new emails.  When I quickly scanned the list, one jumped out at me.  “Here’s How to Acquire #ocks.io”

I wasn’t actively looking to purchase this name and I don’t even own any dot io names.  But it did get my interest.  Looking back I tried to analyze why that caught my attention.  Obviously one reason is because I am a domainer.  But beyond that, it had me thinking… this email is about to tell me something.

If I were an end user, I would be more likely to open this email than if it simply stated the domain name as the title, or even the key words as the title.  This title presupposes that I am already interested in the name. That I want to acquire it.  I’m no psychologist or marketing guru, but I would bet that framing the title in this way introduces some sort of bias toward wanting the name.  Not some magical hypnosis that tricks you into purchasing the name, but a subtle hint that would convince an end user to at least open the email, which is more than half the battle.

Getting your email read is difficult.  Probably 80% of the email I get I don’t even open. Maybe more.  It’s not even all spam.  Some of it is from legit things I sign up for and still never read, so getting to the top of the heap of mail isn’t easy.  I do plan to give this title a shot, with a more well thought out body text than what I received.    I’ll let you know if I see any noticeable results.

Don’t Do This On Twitter

I really like using Twitter.  Recently more than I have in the past.  I like engaging with other people and bantering about domains.  I also feel like there have been better discussions recently, even just to silently observe.   I like to retweet blog articles I enjoy and I’ll also throw up the occasional non-domaining post.  One thing I don’t do is post domains for sale on Twitter.  In my opinion, it’s just not the right tool for this.

It’s one thing if you’re the @DomainKing and you are asking people to post domain names for your review on Million Dollar Wednesday but it’s another to constantly post names and spam up your followers’ feed.   I respect the fact that people are out there hustling and trying to make a sale, so don’t get me wrong, I am not domain shaming anyone (DomainShaming.com – feel free to hand reg it).

It got me thinking… what better place to ask this as a question than Twitter.  Who better to ask than domainers?  I gave it 24 hours and received 28 votes.  When the results were in, 11% claimed to have posted a domain on Twitter and made a sale while 89% claimed not to.

TwitterDomaining

Keep in mind that this is not a scientific, double blind, university sponsored, study supervised by an accounting firm.  But those numbers aren’t promising and they don’t tell the whole story.  How many domains did those sellers have to post to get one sale?    How many of those did you and I need to scroll through and see as we checked our feed for the latest news and information?  I think the name and the seller lose a little credibility when this is seen as Twitter spam.

I’d like to hear from those of you who actually have made a sale and if it was of significant value.  My guess is going to be that you’ve had better luck with other tools and methods.

 

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When I stopped hand registering domains, these 3 things happened

When I began as a domainer, I started with hand registered names and resold a few.  That gave me a taste of what was possible and I was all in.   Since that time, I have bought and sold a few premium domains, but always enjoyed the hand reg hunt for undiscovered gems.   Recently, I proactively took a break from  hand registering domain names and I thought I was going to end up with a post about how I benefited from the experience. How it made me a better domainer.  I thought I was going to end up writing about how it allowed me to focus on higher quality domain names and how my profits increased overtime.  But instead…

I lost focus

As I stopped the daily hunt for names to hand reg, I lost my focus on domaining.   It wasn’t my top of mind passion.  I slowly drifted from DBR, my favorite domain forum, and missed out on all the interactions between the sharp and ever learning domainers at every point in the experience spectrum (this was a huge loss).  I stopped browsing Domaining.com multiple times a day and reduced to just a few times per month.  I pretty much stopped blogging entirely.
It was those quick plunges into Godaddy, whenever the mood struck me, to see if a random name was available that actually kept the passion burning and my mind focused on domains.  Not that hand regs are the core of what I do.  In fact,  I probably look up and find 100 available names for any single hand reg I buy.  I typically maintain an inventory of less than 100 hand regs at any given point.   It’s the thrill of the hunt.

I became less creative

I know a guy who does a crossword puzzle from the newspaper everyday and wont rest until he completes it.  He says he does it to keep his mind working.  I haven’t purchased a paper copy of a newspaper in 15 years.   I had my own way of keeping my mind challenged.

Always trying to come up with good names everywhere I went kept me sharp.  Think about it, it’s like constantly trying to solve a puzzle.  You see something, think a little differently about it, and try to come up with one or two word dot coms that may not have yet been snapped up.  Then you think of variations on that.  Then that leads you to another related domain area to think about.  Sure, the effort doesn’t typically result in a cash cow, but neither does a crossword puzzle.

Cutting back on this exercise definitely had a noticeable impact.  I was just generally becoming less creative.  I noticed that I wasn’t quite as quick with solving problems.   I was less engaged and less interested in solutioning issues that I faced in other areas of my life.  I stopped giving creative business advice to friends.  It just wasn’t as fun or as easy as it once was.

I wasted time

Checking out availability of names or thoughts that popped into my head throught the day was a welcomed break from what ever I was doing.  Let’s face it, there’s probably not one of us that takes enough breaks in the day.  I’m sure I could dig up some research or statistics that would support my claim that taking breaks makes you more productive.
When I took breaks to brainstorm some domain names, they were short breaks.  A matter of minutes.  It felt productive even though you could argue that I was still wasting time.  Buy it occasionally resulted in an easy sale and a few bucks.
During “the break” when I wasn’t looking up domains, I would do other things online to try to fill the void.  I would watch stupid videos and visit mindless websites.  I would click on the link to see what “20 celebrities from the 90’s look like today, number 7 will shock you.”  Before you know it, a half hour has gone by and I have nothing to show for it.

So what’s next?

Hand registering domains is fun for me.  Even just the act of brainstorming possible domain names.   I enjoy it.  It motivates me and I truely believe it keeps my mind sharp.  Besides, it’s even more fun when you find a gem and flip it.  So I’m back at it, spending some of my time exploring the art of hand reg’ing.  Hey, that just gave me an idea…