Don’t Do This On Twitter

I really like using Twitter.  Recently more than I have in the past.  I like engaging with other people and bantering about domains.  I also feel like there have been better discussions recently, even just to silently observe.   I like to retweet blog articles I enjoy and I’ll also throw up the occasional non-domaining post.  One thing I don’t do is post domains for sale on Twitter.  In my opinion, it’s just not the right tool for this.

It’s one thing if you’re the @DomainKing and you are asking people to post domain names for your review on Million Dollar Wednesday but it’s another to constantly post names and spam up your followers’ feed.   I respect the fact that people are out there hustling and trying to make a sale, so don’t get me wrong, I am not domain shaming anyone (DomainShaming.com – feel free to hand reg it).

It got me thinking… what better place to ask this as a question than Twitter.  Who better to ask than domainers?  I gave it 24 hours and received 28 votes.  When the results were in, 11% claimed to have posted a domain on Twitter and made a sale while 89% claimed not to.

TwitterDomaining

Keep in mind that this is not a scientific, double blind, university sponsored, study supervised by an accounting firm.  But those numbers aren’t promising and they don’t tell the whole story.  How many domains did those sellers have to post to get one sale?    How many of those did you and I need to scroll through and see as we checked our feed for the latest news and information?  I think the name and the seller lose a little credibility when this is seen as Twitter spam.

I’d like to hear from those of you who actually have made a sale and if it was of significant value.  My guess is going to be that you’ve had better luck with other tools and methods.

 

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2 Comments Don’t Do This On Twitter

  1. Alvin Brown

    Hi Mike,

    I certainly agree with you in not using Twitter to post specific domains, with or without pricing, for sales. Doing so could backfire on the seller and give a buyer unintended negotiating power. All it takes is a quick search to find an old domain for sale posted with price to destroy a deal. 😉

    Reply
    1. Mike Sullivan

      @Alvin – That’s an excellent point, to search twitter for an old domain sale to get better leverage on a deal. Good lesson for those that do post domains for sale on twitter.

      Reply

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